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Brushing Mistakes You Don’t Know You’re Making

May 13th, 2020

It’s great that you’re enthusiastic about your dental health! Here are some tips from Drs. Bonni Boone, Susan Cocquyt, and Lori Risser and our team to make sure you are getting the most out of your brushing by avoiding common mistakes.

Choose the right brush

In almost every case, a soft brush provides the right amount of bristle-strength to clean your teeth and gums effectively. Hard bristles can damage sensitive enamel and gum tissue, so treat yourself kindly. Also, choose a brush head that’s the right size for your mouth, since a toothbrush that’s too large can be uncomfortable and unable to reach all the areas you need to brush.

Don’t keep your brush too long

Three months is about the average life of a toothbrush. Over time, bristles become frayed or worn and lose their effectiveness. It’s also a good idea to replace your brush after an illness.

Be gentle

Even with a soft brush, it’s possible to brush so hard that your enamel and gums are affected. Think of yourself as massaging your teeth and gums rather than scrubbing them.

Use proper technique

Using a “sawing” back-and-forth motion is hard on your enamel and misses plaque and debris between the teeth. Hold your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle, especially at the gumline, to gently remove plaque. Use short strokes or a circular motion to clean as much of the surface and between the teeth as possible. Make sure you cover all the surfaces of your teeth: outside, inside, and chewing. And don’t forget your tongue!

Take your time

Brushing twice a day for two minutes each time is the standard. Most people brush much less; try using the stopwatch on your phone or a two-minute timer to make sure you are spending enough time brushing. On the other hand, if you brush too hard or too often, remember that over-brushing can lead to problems for your gums and enamel.

Your daily routine might be fast and furious, but your dental routine requires a gentle, methodical approach. Ask at your next visit to our South Bend, IN office, and we will be happy to help you design the perfect brushing practices for your busy life.

Five Things You Should Never Do With Your Toothbrush

May 6th, 2020

When’s the last time you gave your toothbrush any serious thought? Sure, you use it every day (and ideally twice), and you know that with a dollop of toothpaste it waxes up your pearly whites nicely, not to mention preventing bacteria, plaque, and inflammation.

But what are the things you should never do with your toothbrush? Here’s a brush-up on five toothbrush no-nos, from Erskine Family Dentistry.

1. If you have your toothbrush too close to the toilet, you’re brushing your teeth with what’s in your toilet. In other words, keep your toothbrush stored as far from the toilet as possible.

2. The average toothbrush harbors ten million microbes. Many families keep their toothbrushes jammed together in a cup holder on the bathroom sink, but this can lead to cross-contamination. Family members’ toothbrushes should be kept an inch apart. Don’t worry; they won’t take it personally.

3. Don’t delay replacing your toothbrush. It’s best to purchase a new one every three to four months, but by all means get one sooner if the bristles are broken down because of your frequent and vigorous brushing. If you have a cold or the flu, replace your toothbrush after you recover.

4. Store your toothbrush out of the reach of toddlers. The last thing you want is for your toothbrush to be chewed like a pacifier, dipped in toilet water, or used to probe the dusty heating ducts.

5. Sharing is caring, right? Your parents probably taught you the importance of sharing back when you were, well, dipping their improperly stored toothbrushes in toilet water. But here’s the thing: As important as sharing is, there are some things you just don’t share, and your toothbrush is one of them.

Re-Opening of Erskine Family Dentistry Announcement

April 30th, 2020

Greetings from Erskine Family Dentistry. We hope everyone is staying safe and healthy during this challenging time. We are so excited to announce that our office is re-opening on May 4! Our team is working hard contacting patients now to reschedule canceled appointments. If you’d like to schedule an appointment with us please call 574-299-9300.
With all the extra time spent at home lately, we hope everyone has taken excellent care of their teeth to maintain their beautiful smiles! By diligent daily home care routines, eating a balanced healthy diet, minimizing sugar and acids in foods and drinks, brushing twice a day, and flossing once each day you can keep your smile healthy between your visits to our office. Please ask us for other dental tips the next time you visit us.
We want to reassure you that our practice is taking extra precautions during Covid-19 in order to keep our team and patients healthy. Patients will be pre-screened on the confirmation phone call, and upon arrival will be asked to stay in their cars. Once we are ready for an appointment, we will call and bring the patient in practicing social distancing. We are also taking temperatures and giving patients facemasks to wear until their dental work begins. Every sterilization protocol will be followed and a new air filtration system has been installed in our practice which kills 99.3% of all bacteria, fungus and viruses in the air.
Though the last month has held some uncertainties, our team has taken advantage of the extra time to maintain a healthy lifestyle, both physically and mentally, by eating healthy, exercising, practicing good dental home care, and connecting with our team, families and friends virtually.
Our team is so eager and excited to see all our wonderful patients again soon!

Xerostomia: Big Word, Common Problem

April 29th, 2020

Xerostomia might sound like a serious and rare condition, but it’s more common than you think. If you’ve been feeling like your mouth is constantly dry, you may already be having your first encounter with it.

Xerostomia refers to when you have a dry mouth due to absent or reduced saliva flow. Now you might assume this is not a big deal, but a lack of saliva can threaten your dental health or worse, because it can be a sign of a bigger overall problem.

Some of the more common symptoms to watch for are a sore throat, difficulty swallowing, a burning sensation on the tongue, and of course, a significant lack of saliva. Because xerostomia entails a reduction in saliva, you have less of a buffer between your teeth and the food you eat, which makes you more vulnerable to cavities and tooth decay. It also means that food is more likely to get stuck in your mouth.

So what causes xerostomia? There can be many different culprits. One of the most common causes involves medication. If you’re taking antidepressants, muscle relaxers, anti-diarrhea medicine, anti-anxiety medicine, or antihistamines, this could be the reason for your xerostomia.

Dry mouth may also be a warning sign for other health issues. These can include lupus, diabetes, thyroid disease, arthritis, or hypertension. Patients that receive any kind of chemotherapy might also experience xerostomia as a side effect of their treatment.

If you’re experiencing symptoms of dry mouth, there are several things you can do:

  • This may seem obvious, but you should drink generous amounts of water. If you’re taking any of the medications known to cause xerostomia, a glass of water before and after administering the medication could be helpful.
  • Avoid heavily caffeinated drinks, since they will dehydrate you further.
  • Opt for a mouthwash that contains little to no alcohol.
  • Consume excessively sugary or acidic foods in moderation, if at all.
  • Try adding a humidifier to your room while you sleep, to add moisture to the air you’ll be breathing.

As always, stay on top of your brushing and flossing routines, and if you feel you might be suffering from xerostomia, please let Drs. Bonni Boone, Susan Cocquyt, and Lori Risser know during your next visit to our South Bend, IN office. We’re happy to recommend products we’ve found to be successful in treating xerostomia.

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